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Open Borders, Amnesty and the Burger Flipping Economy


Zuckerberg & Bloomberg Amnesty Burger Cartoon

In state after state new economic studies by the Center for Immigration Studies have found that all or most of the new jobs created in the Obama economy have gone to immigrants – both legal and illegal.
 
Tennessee's working-age immigrant population grew 176 percent from 2000 to 2014, one of the highest of any state in the nation. Yet the number of natives working in 2014 was actually lower than in 2000. The total number of working-age (16 to 65) immigrants (legal and illegal) holding a job in Tennessee increased by 94,000 from the first quarter of 2000 to the first quarter of 2014, while the number of working-age natives with a job declined by 47,000 over the same period.
 
Because the native-born population in Tennessee grew significantly, but the percentage working fell, there were nearly 300,000 more working-age natives not working in the first quarter of 2014 than in 2000*. (emphasis ours)
 
In North Carolina the situation was much the same. North Carolina’s working-age immigrant population grew 146 percent from 2000 to 2014, one of the highest rates of any state in the nation. Yet the number of natives working in 2014 was actually lower than in 2000. The total number of working-age (16 to 65) immigrants (legal and illegal) holding a job in North Carolina increased by 313,000 from the first quarter of 2000 to the first quarter of 2014, while the number of working-age natives with a job declined by 32,000 over the same time.
 
Because the native working-age population in North Carolina grew significantly, but the share working actually fell, there were 720,000 more working-age natives not working in the first quarter of 2014 than in 2000 — a 56 percent increase.* (emphasis ours)
 
Similarly, Georgia's working-age immigrant population grew 167 percent from 2000 to 2014, one of the highest of any state in the nation. Yet the number of working-age natives working in 2014 was actually lower than in 2000. The total number of working-age (16 to 65) immigrants (legal and illegal) holding a job in Georgia increased by 400,000 from the first quarter of 2000 to the first quarter of 2014, while the number of working-age natives with a job declined by 71,000 over the same time frame.
 
Because the native working-age population in Georgia grew significantly, but the share working actually fell, there were 684,000 more working-age natives not working in the first quarter of 2014 than in 2000 — a 52 percent increase.* (emphasis ours)
 
These studies, and others with similar results for other states, put to lie the argument that immigration, on balance, increases job opportunities for natives.
 
By our calculation these studies show that in these three states alone some 1.7 million native-born American workers have been displaced by immigrants – both legal and illegal.
 
Senator Jeff Session, one of the real heroes of the battle to defeat amnesty for illegal aliens and open borders legislation that would permanently flood America with low-cost, low-skilled workers has it right on the money when he called out establishment Republicans for siding with the cheap labor wing of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
 
“The White House and Senate Democrats shamelessly coordinated with a small cadre of CEOs to pressure House Republicans to yield. It’s time for Republicans to tell these special interests to get lost and to be the one party that will defend the interests of the millions of Americans looking for better jobs and better wages.”
 
Jeff Sessions, Ted Cruz, Louie Gohmert and Steve King have been the Republican leaders for common-sense immigration policy. The question for the rest of the GOP on Capitol Hill is, will Republicans tell these special interests that benefit from cheap labor to get lost? Democrats long ago stopped being the party of the little guy in favor of identity politics, Republicans can become a permanent majority if they will defend American exceptionalism and the interests of the millions of Americans looking for better jobs and better wages, or they can become a permanent and irrelevant minority if they continue to opt to go with the Fortune 500 at the expense of America’s workers and small business people.

*Center for Immigration Studies calculation

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