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GOP List Of Shame On Budget Vote

Republican Leaders
Last week the House passed a two-year, $2.7 trillion spending agreement on a 284-149 vote. The deal is expected to clear the Senate sometime this week.

Some 65 out of 197 House Republicans succumbed to pleas from the establishment Republican House leadership and ended up voting for the measure, but even a boost from President Trump could not push the vote into a majority of the House Republican Conference.

Rank-and-file GOP lawmakers disliked the agreement, which calls for more than $320 billion in spending over sequestration levels over the next two years. One-hundred-thirty-two Republicans voted against it, a big majority of the GOP conference, according to reporting by POLITICO.

Those who voted in favor of the trillion-dollar deficit were mostly the usual cast of big spending Republicans: Don Young of Alaska, Mario Diaz-Balart of Florida, Tom Cole of Oklahoma, Hal Rogers of Kentucky, etc. coupled with the House GOP leadership and leadership wannabees like Patrick McHenry.

But there were some votes in favor that were disappointments: Devin Nunes, Mac Thornberry, Doug Collins and Vicky Hartzler are names that immediately jump out in that category.

Culling through their public statements it looks like the common denominator of our disappointments was the perennial “but the troops” argument that Republicans always make to avoid a spending fight – and yes, even President Reagan did much the same thing in making deals with the Democrats who held the House majority in his day.

As our friend Rachel Bovard explained in her column “Fiscal Conservatism, R.I.P.” instead of working with fiscal conservatives within the administration, Senate Republican leadership haughtily declared they would not negotiate with the president’s staff, and hid behind misleading arguments about military funding.

Defense hawks and some in the White House touted the deal as a win for the military, but this is hardly the case. Funding for the troops was again cynically used to manipulate support for a deal that, in reality, wrote Ms. Bovard, only increases defense spending above Fiscal Year 2019 levels by $5 billion.

Though some on the Right applauded the deal for preventing Nancy Pelosi’s Democrats from inserting liberal policy provisions—colloquially referred to as “poison pills”—this mischaracterizes as victory an agreement that does little more than enshrine the status quo noted Ms. Bovard.

We agree. From our perspective this was no victory, but another “fear The Turtle” moment in which the not-so-subtle big spending hand of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell manipulated the White House and the House Republican Leadership into once again abandoning any pretense of fiscal restraint.

As an Army brat, born at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri, in an era when married officer’s housing was a house trailer you bought yourself, I have plenty of empathy with the argument that military families deserve the pay and quality of life improvements included in this budget deal.

But I am also reminded of what former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Michael Mullen warned in remarks delivered on Sept. 22, 2011: “I believe the single, biggest threat to our national security is debt.”

My old friend former Senator and out-going Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats said much the same thing just last year, "I'm concerned that our increasing fractious political process, particularly with respect to federal spending, is threatening our ability to properly defend our nation both in the short term and especially in the long term… The failure to address our longterm fiscal situation has increased the national debt to over $20 trillion and growing."

But retired Rear Admiral Jamie Barnett may have summed-up our deficit best in a column for The Hill: “…the first deficit that must be addressed is one of leadership. Until our political leaders move the national debt to a central focus, view it as a threat to national security, and work for immediate and yet long-term non-partisan solutions, the U.S. is at risk. That risk may not be existential, but it is a deadly risk to American prosperity, our way of life, our leadership in the world and perhaps to our system of government.”

Much as we hate to say it about some of our friends, this is the list of Republicans who failed that test of leadership on last week’s spending bill vote.

Aderholt
Babin
Bacon
Bergman
Bilirakis
Bishop (UT)
Bost
Brady
Brooks (IN)
Calvert
Carter (TX)
Cheney
Cole
Collins (GA)
Collins (NY)
Conaway
Cook
Davis, Rodney
Diaz-Balart
Dunn
Ferguson
Fitzpatrick
Fleischmann
Fortenberry
Granger
Guthrie
Hartzler
Hill (AR)
Hurd (TX)
Johnson (OH)
Joyce (OH)
Katko
King (NY)
Kinzinger
Kustoff (TN)
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
McCarthy
McCaul
McHenry
Meuser
Miller
Nunes
Palazzo
Pence
Reschenthaler
Roby
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rutherford
Scalise
Simpson
Stauber
Stefanik
Stewart
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Turner
Upton
Walden
Wilson (SC)
Womack
Woodall
Young

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GOP budget vote

The basic Potomac two step in action. Once everyone understands that both parties are big government oriented and solidly entrenched with print and spend policies, this becomes understandable. The real difference between the parties is that the DOC wants to socialize at 100 mph and the GOP at 50 mph. In fact the GOP now behaves like the DOC of the 1960's and the DOC is unidentifiable from the Communist Party of the US. So we might say it is not left and right anymore is is extreme left and left. And the average American is,of course, left out.