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NYT Melt Down: Sen. Cotton Suggests Trump Do What Ike Did When Democrats Sided With Rioters

Tom Cotton NYT
On Wednesday, June 3, 2020, The New York Times published an op-ed by Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) which noted in part:

This week, rioters have plunged many American cities into anarchy, recalling the widespread violence of the 1960s.

New York City suffered the worst of the riots Monday night, as Mayor Bill de Blasio stood by while Midtown Manhattan descended into lawlessness. Bands of looters roved the streets, smashing and emptying hundreds of businesses. Some even drove exotic cars; the riots were carnivals for the thrill-seeking rich as well as other criminal elements.

Outnumbered police officers, encumbered by feckless politicians, bore the brunt of the violence. In New York State, rioters ran over officers with cars on at least three occasions. In Las Vegas, an officer is in “grave” condition after being shot in the head by a rioter. In St. Louis, four police officers were shot as they attempted to disperse a mob throwing bricks and dumping gasoline; in a separate incident, a 77-year-old retired police captain was shot to death as he tried to stop looters from ransacking a pawnshop. This is “somebody’s granddaddy,” a bystander screamed at the scene.

Some elites have excused this orgy of violence in the spirit of radical chic, calling it an understandable response to the wrongful death of George Floyd. Those excuses are built on a revolting moral equivalence of rioters and looters to peaceful, law-abiding protesters. A majority who seek to protest peacefully shouldn’t be confused with bands of miscreants.

Senator Cotton further suggested that:

The pace of looting and disorder may fluctuate from night to night, but it’s past time to support local law enforcement with federal authority. Some governors have mobilized the National Guard, yet others refuse, and in some cases the rioters still outnumber the police and Guard combined. In these circumstances, the Insurrection Act authorizes the president to employ the military “or any other means” in “cases of insurrection, or obstruction to the laws.”

The pace of looting and disorder may fluctuate from night to night, but it’s past time to support local law enforcement with federal authority. Some governors have mobilized the National Guard, yet others refuse, and in some cases the rioters still outnumber the police and Guard combined. In these circumstances, the Insurrection Act authorizes the president to employ the military “or any other means” in “cases of insurrection, or obstruction to the laws.”

The response from the Times’ own staff and the rest of woke Leftist journalism was mass apoplexy combined with swift demands that the op-ed be taken down and that Senator Cotton be banned from various social media platforms for posting what the First Lady of leftist journalism had allowed on its opinion pages.

On cue, the NYT’s editorial page editor James Bennet groveled before the mob and even went so far as to give credibility to “a concern that’s being expressed within The Times: A fear that we have endangered our colleagues, and specifically our African-American colleagues, by publishing Cotton’s Op-Ed.”

Mr. Bennet’s colleagues of all ethnicities are undoubtedly safe from military peacekeepers as long as they are not emptying out the nearest Gucci boutique or throwing Molotov Cocktails at the police as two Ivy League-educated lawyers were caught doing – but this line of thought, entertaining as it is, is distracting us from the really important point of Senator Cotton’s op-ed.

Sen. Cotton recounted a list of occasions upon which past presidents had deployed federal troops to restore civil order:

For instance, during the 1950s and 1960s, Presidents Dwight Eisenhower, John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson called out the military to disperse mobs that prevented school desegregation or threatened innocent lives and property. This happened in my own state. Gov. Orval Faubus, a racist Democrat, mobilized our National Guard in 1957 to obstruct desegregation at Little Rock Central High School. President Eisenhower federalized the Guard and called in the 101st Airborne in response. The failure to do so, he said, “would be tantamount to acquiescence in anarchy.”

More recently, President George H.W. Bush ordered the Army’s Seventh Infantry and 1,500 Marines to protect Los Angeles during race riots in 1992. He acknowledged his disgust at Rodney King’s treatment — “what I saw made me sick” — but he knew deadly rioting would only multiply the victims, of all races and from all walks of life.

What immediately struck me when I read Senator Cotton’s op-ed is that all the examples he cited involved Democrats either losing control of civil order, or actively siding with the rioters – just like today.

What is the difference between Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus, a racist Democrat, siding with the rioters to prevent the integration of Little Rock Central High School and New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio, a racist Democrat, siding with the rioters and looters destroying Manhattan’s retail district? Both were using the power of their office to incite violence to achieve political ends.

Senator Cotton was right, and President Trump shouldn’t hesitate to do what presidents have always done when Democrat local and state officials refuse to do their jobs or worse, join the rioters; send in federal troops and restore order and constitutional liberty for all citizens.

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