Donald Trump

For Trump, challenge of governing with Dem House, but full speed ahead with GOP Senate

Byron York, Washington Examiner

Look for Trump to pursue an even more Senate-focused strategy. A continued string of judicial confirmations, coupled with executive actions that do not require congressional approval, could give the president more accomplishments even if he cannot pass legislation. Still, Trump cannot ignore the House, and certainly not a House that plans to bury him in subpoenas and might possibly try to impeach him. Other presidents, like Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, have faced first midterm losses and gone on to win re-election. If Trump can keep the nominations machine going, and skillfully manage his relations with the Democratic House, there's a chance he can do it, too.

Divisive Dems may be own undoing with kinder, gentler Trump

Michael Goodwin, New York Post

Democrats' tendency to overplay their hand in their fits of rage could undo them again. If they investigate at the expense of legislating and refuse to bargain in good faith over such issues as immigration and infrastructure, they will offer voters a stark contrast for 2020. Which is why a cooler Trump could be just the ticket to lower the too-hot political temperature. Trump 2.0 can make deals with the Dems, if they are inclined, or he can let them make fools of themselves. Either way, he will be the grown-up in the room.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: 2018’s split decision goes to Donald Trump and his Senate Republicans

Donald Trump will act like nothing’s different after all of this… but will everyone else? American politics is at best an unpredictable exercise. 2018 proved to be about what most people thought – lots of surprises and upsets… and pollsters who’re eating crow today. The next two years will be fascinating to watch.

A Democratic Congress Could Be a Perfect Foil for Trump

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

A Democratic House will be a natural foil for President Trump, an institution with responsibility but without real power. And should the economy, which has been running splendidly under a Republican Congress and president start to sputter under a divided Congress, there is no doubt that the Democratic House majority, with its anti-capitalist left and socialist ideology, would emerge as the primary suspect. 2019 is thus shaping up to be a year of gridlock on Capitol Hill, with the Senate attempting to expeditiously move through Trump's nominated judges, and a Democratic House potentially hassling the White House and Trump administration with a snowstorm of subpoenas.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: 2018 elections a wakeup call to the ruling class regardless of outcome

Win or lose, today marks the end of the beginning. The Trump administration’s first two years were a resounding success and the president will sustain the momentum regardless of which party controls the House come January. Voting is a civic duty – never more so than this year.

Yes, Trump is huge factor in midterms. But which Trump?

Byron York, Washington Examiner

Trump is a presence in each Minnesota district and in each campaign — but not necessarily the same Trump. In some races, Trump is the Trump of the daily commotion on cable TV and the Internet — the president who, according to his many detractors, writes outrageous tweets, dog-whistles bigotry, and is increasingly cornered by the Russia investigation. But in other races, there is an entirely different Trump at work. That Trump is the president who is making the economy better by cutting regulations that handicapped local mining, logging, and manufacturing. That Trump is a president protecting not just individual industries and incomes but a way of life.

This Tuesday America Takes an IQ Test

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

The president -- forget the Republican candidates who have been decreed little more than "fifth business"-- tweets too much, is a braggart, insults people, is a totalitarian, a racist, a sexist, a homophobe, a xenophobe, etc., etc.  Never mind what he actually does provides no evidence of that, indeed often proves the opposite. He has bad manners. The country must throw him and his party out. The media says so and it has to be. This is "can't stand prosperity" on steroids.  It is a country shooting itself in the foot to please a group of "elites" whose sensibilities are offended and, even more, who are driven by envy and a lust for power.

Lemon's animosity toward Trump alienates everyday Americans

Larry O'Connor, Washington Times

Don Lemon has used his platform for blistering monologues and biased panel discussions that often conclude with Mr. Lemon chastising or even yelling at one of his guests who attempt to speak on behalf of Mr. Trump or his supporters. If you support Mr. Trump, his show is completely unwatchable. And that’s the point. CNN has clearly decided that they don’t want Trump supporters watching. They believe they’re doing just fine without you, thank you very much. But if a network’s entire brand is defined by being anti-Trump, what exactly are you once he is no longer president? Most of us will never know because we will have already made a habit out of not watching.

CNN’s Existential War With Trump

Victor Davis Hanson, American Greatness

The names of those who have abused the journalistic ethos and the regrettable failure of CNN to uphold media standards are a matter of record. The best way to stop the chronic Trump attacks on the veracity of CNN is not to unleash a rude and boisterous Acosta to argue endlessly with Sarah Huckabee Sanders, but simply to ensure that CNN news reports are fact-checked and not in need of retractions or firings, that CNN hosts, contributors, and anchors do not stoop to profanity, scatology, racism, and ahistorical comparisons to Stalin and Hitler, and that CNN’s staff and hosts do not joke about the president being killed through plane crashes and decapitation.

A Revolution in the Past 14 Years: Conservatives and Alternative Media

By Richard A. Viguerie and David Franke, Authors of America’s Right Turn (2004)
Much has happened in the alternative media since we wrote America’s Right Turn in 2004. Where do conservatives stand today, compared to liberals, in political direct mail, talk radio, cable TV, the Internet, and the new social media? Here’s a scorecard.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: Democrats’ closing pitch reads like something out of the kook handbook

Tomorrow’s election is crucial to President Trump’s drive to make America great again. Democrats’ inability to expand their coalition beyond goodie-grabbers and disaffected leftist “resistance” loonies is telling. Americans shouldn’t let them get away with it…vote Republican.

Donald Trump’s Wise Challenge to Birthright Citizenship

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

To most Americans, the fate and future of the republic is more likely to be determined on the U.S.-Mexican border than on the border between Syria and Iraq. To the frustration of egalitarians, the meritocracy of free and fair competition in this most diverse of great nations is producing an inequality of rewards and a visible hierarchy of achievement. Politically, continued mass migration to the USA by peoples of color, who vote 70 to 90 percent Democrat, is going to change our country another way. Red state America will inevitably turn blue.

Sure, Let’s All Unify...Around Donald Trump

Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

The simple truth is that these shrill demands for unity are really demands for our surrender. The elitists who are howling that we have to come together have no intention of coming together with us. Rather, they want us to come together around them and the very same policies, initiatives, and weird taboos that we’ve spent the last few election cycles repudiating. What, exactly, do these people propose to give up to help close America’s divide? Their campaigns against our free speech? Our religions? Our guns? Our desire for people to use the right bathroom? Nothing, nada, zip.

Pittsburgh and the Misplaced Anger of 'Liberal' Jews

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

When I see the Jewish anti-Trump demonstrators, I see people who are very depressed, truly unhappy people whose anger could never be assuaged — folks with a cosmic emptiness of a sort. They need something to protest, always, to feel alive in their search for a utopia that could never be achieved. If it weren't Trump, it would be someone or something else. There is a narcissistic wound as deep as the Mariana Trench. These people make me think of Berlin in the 1930s, and why things happened the way they happened. They would never fight back.

But is it still 'the economy, Stupid'?

Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

If Trump had been content to do what previous conservative presidents did, to talk about what a great thing it would be if he could do all these good things and one day he surely would, the Democrats would have been pleased to give him a nice (figurative) pat on the head and everyone could have got on with civility, the rage this year. But he actually set out to do these things, and that’s not the way the Washington game is meant to be played. If the Democrats take the House, we can expect the game to get meaner. Chuck and Nancy and Maxine promise an impeachment party, and it will be an exercise in ultimate futility. But we’ll have fun breaking some furniture.

Trump: Military Can Use Force At Border

President Donald Trump said yesterday the military will respond with force to anyone in the invading migrant “caravans” who attacks soldiers with rocks or other objects. "They want to throw rocks at our military, our military fights back," Trump said during a White House press conference about immigration.

Outsiders vs. Insiders: In 2018’s rapid dash to the election R’s tout security, D’s pound race

With just days to go until Americans vote in the midterm elections both parties are busy making their closing arguments to voters on the importance of congressional majorities. Republicans make it all about security, Democrats just want to talk healthcare, race and gender.

They Can't Bear the Thought That Trump's Win Was No Anomaly

Roger Kimball, PJ Media

I do not of course know what is going to happen next Tuesday. But if, as seems to me increasingly likely, the Republicans hold the House, the anti-Trump and NeverTrump fraternity will be dealt a cruel blow. Not only will they have lost, not only will their confident predications have been in vain, but their entire sense of the way the world works will have been further undermined. The thing that was impossible, that could not have happened, will have turned out to be not an inexplicable singularity but a corroboration of a new dispensation -- a dispensation, moreover, that has no place for them.

Trump’s reversal of failed Obama policies has created a booming economy

Andy Puzder, Fox News

Let’s be clear: The economy is booming because President Trump reversed President Obama’s economic policies – not because Trump furthered the Obama policies. President Obama raised taxes on businesses and individuals. He expanded the federal government’s size and power through dramatic increases in the number and scope of federal regulations. He discouraged domestic energy production – for example, refusing to authorize the Keystone XL pipeline and openly attempting to bankrupt the coal industry. The economy is now booming because President Trump took the opposite course.

Birthright citizenship needs fixing

Editors, Washington Examiner

The constitutional issues on children born to other visitors to the U.S. are more complicated — surely too complicated for the president to resolve with an executive order. But as a matter of policy, the U.S. should have a more sensible position than it does now, comparable to those of most other countries, which prevent foreigners from essentially stealing that precious commodity that is the proudest boast of citizens: "I'm an American."