House

DOJ Should Charge House Dems With Extortion For Barr Contempt Threat

Mark J. Fitzgibbons, Daily Caller

Is it a valid legislative power or purpose to require someone to commit a crime to reply to a congressional subpoena? Barr and the DOJ have presented the clear state of the law, which is undisputed, that the grand jury information in the Mueller report is confidential under law. It is easy to conclude Congress may not order anyone — particularly the United States attorney general — to commit a crime by disclosing that information. Bill Barr’s composure during the post-Mueller report circus shows that he’s got sand. I would not be surprised if his DOJ under the master counter-puncher, Donald Trump, decided to get aggressive with Nadler, whose claim of a constitutional crisis could come back to bite him.

House To Modernize But More Transparency Not on the Agenda

Mark Tapscott, The Epoch Times

Among Nancy Pelosi’s first moves as Speaker of the House was creating the Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress, but making the House more transparent—and thus more accountable to voters—got lost somewhere along the way. Political strategists from across the ideological spectrum expressed disappointment with the committee’s early performance. “The entire scope of the purposes of the committee is subject to potential abuse unless its work is done with great transparency,” warned Mark Fitzgibbons.

House Freedom Caucus Under Assault

The charge of not being a “team player” is what the Republican establishment uses to justify doing political damage to a conservative in the hope that the conservative will either be brought to heel, or, better yet, defeated in the next election.

Democrats keep proving how detached they are from reality

Michael Goodwin, New York Post

Never in modern times has there been such a disconnect between the opposition party and the realities of national life. The very talk of removing Trump, without evidence of an impeachable offense, is a stick in the eye to history and most Americans. To be clear, the disconnect is not the product of policy differences, though they exist too. This is instead a mass outbreak of Trump Derangement Syndrome that, for those infected, can be cured only by undoing the results of the 2016 election. And if by some lightning strike they succeed, then what? Impeach President Mike Pence, too?

Senator Lindsey Graham Makes A Great Point

Sen. Lindsey Graham said Sunday, “We’ll have offers on the table when we find somebody that’s not crazy to deal with…” judging by what the Democrats’ leaders are saying it looks like it is going to be a long shutdown, if it can’t end until someone who is not crazy represents them at the negotiating table.

Democrats Keep Their Promises

Much as we dislike the substance of the Democrats’ promises, as Republican Rep. Tom Reed’s flirtation with voting for the Democratic rules package demonstrates, it is hard to argue with the appeal of politicians who actually do what they say they will do, even if what they promise is a disaster waiting to happen.

Latino voters in Florida could help Republicans win in key races

Salena Zito, New York Post

This is Florida, where hurricanes, pythons and local issues like the caravan of Latin Americans approaching the border dominate the conversation. “First of all, let’s make something clear. To me, there’s a big difference between an immigrant and an illegal,” one voter said. “And in all fairness to everyone, you have to follow the law.” Two Latino candidates from two Latino majority districts could help the GOP keep their House majority on Tuesday. And, in the richest of ironies, voters who dislike Trump but are now leaning Republican could make all the difference.

Nancy Pelosi Is Damaging Democrats’ Takeover Chances

John Fund, National Review

A “Bye, Nancy” pass to appeal to swing voters strikes me as a likely October surprise. Republicans haven’t been buoyed by the strong economy as much as they thought they would be. They will probably fall back on warning voters about what a return to power by increasingly liberal Democrats would mean: efforts to scale back border controls and even abolish ICE, higher taxes and more regulation, and a focus on impeaching President Trump. Despite her best efforts to downplay such issues, Nancy Pelosi is easily identified with this left-wing agenda.

House Republicans Grill Rosenstein over Trump-Russia

Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

In our system of separation of powers, the political branches are designed to scrap with each other, not dictate to each other. It is common for both Congress and the executive to have perfectly legitimate reasons for taking antagonistic positions. It is similarly routine for each of them to suspect that the other is acting for illegitimate reasons — maybe the congressional majority is politically motivated to protect the president; maybe the executive agencies are using national-security and ongoing investigations as a pretext to conceal misconduct.

The House GOP’s Outlook Is Better Than You Think

Jim Geraghty, National Review

A significant number of those retiring House Republicans represent districts where the GOP traditionally wins, and about half of them are districts where the GOP candidate usually wins by a wide margin. A seat-by-seat analysis suggests that Democrats have only about 14 to 15 really good opportunities to pick up open seats — and that Republicans might snag some open seats from the Democrats, too.

Conservative Leaders To Ryan: Pass Budget Resolution Now!

Conservative leaders, including CHQ Chairman Richard A. Viguerie have written to Speaker Ryan telling him to stop stalling around on passing a budget because the quickest path to passing a tax reform bill is to move directly to a House vote on the Senate-passed budget resolution.

Democratic Dreams of Retaking Congress are a Fantasy

Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

Two-thirds of the 435 districts are effectively off the table, and only 50 or so seats are regarded by both parties as competitive. Sad, but true, and it takes something really, really yuuuuge to upset that arithmetic, and only inside the media bubble is Donald Trump likely to be that yuuuuge. His numbers are bad, but would have to get considerably badder to be yuuuge enough be catastrophic.

The House’s Job Now? Keep Calm

Kimberley Strassel, Wall Street Journal

House Republicans have an obligation to their struggling constituents to embrace any idea that can make the bill better—even if it isn’t their own. They also have an obligation to work as open-mindedly with the Senate as they recently did with each other. The enemy isn’t fellow Republicans. It’s ObamaCare.

Republicans Hold the Senate on a Night that Defied the Odds

Eliana Johnson, National Review

Republican Senate candidates spent most of the election season running away from Donald Trump, fearful that supporting him would sink their campaigns and cost their party the Senate majority. And yet it was in part Trump’s shocking electoral-college victory against Hillary Clinton that helped Republicans hold the upper chamber against long odds.

The McMullin Fantasy and the 12th Amendment

Editors, Washington Examiner

A victory in Utah won't make McMullin president. If it accomplishes anything, it will be to encourage both parties to reflect about the processes that gave us the two most unpopular presidential nominees in modern history.

So Far, Trump Is Not Sinking Down-Ballot Republicans

Michael Barone, National Review

So far, down-ballot contests look less like the straight-ticket battles of recent years, in which few candidates ran significantly ahead of or behind party nominees. Instead, they look more like 1970s and 1980s contests, in which many incumbents and challengers, mostly Democrats but also Republicans, continually improvised and created individual personas tailored to their constituencies and capable of distinguishing them from unpopular national party leaders.

Which party will win the Senate and House?

Michael Barone, Washington Examiner

Turnout has been declining, not increasing, during the Obama years, and the Clinton campaign is clearly worried about low turnout, especially among millennials. The Senate and House contests may turn on which side's turnout sags most.

House Votes 245-182 for Conscience Protection Act

CNS News Staff

The Conscience Protection Act, which prohibits government from discriminating against health-care providers who do not want to perform or cooperate in abortions. The bill also gives such health-care providers the power to bring civil action if they are targeted by such discrimination.

House conservatives push for strong majority of majority rule

Scott Wong, The Hill

Conservatives extracted a promise from Paul Ryan last fall before he agreed to serve as Speaker of the House: The Wisconsin Republican would only bring immigration bills to the floor if they had backing from the majority of the GOP conference. Now some conservatives are saying that may be too narrow an application of the GOP practice known for years as the “Hastert Rule.”

FedUp PAC Poll: Conservatives Say “No” to Paul Ryan’s Puerto Rico Bailout

The Puerto Rico bailout had been expected to pass the House last week but was delayed when conservatives objected that it would allow Puerto Rico to refuse to pay almost half of its debt.  Conservatives also oppose any taxpayer bailout, which Speaker Paul Ryan and the GOP leadership have mentioned as another possibility.