Iran

Trump Takes the Right Position (Again) on Khashoggi

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

As for Trump, I think once again he is being smart not following the herd.  If MBS turns out to be a total swine, there's plenty of time to react accordingly.  If not, the president has properly hedged his bets.  In any case, in a world (the M. E.) where practically all leaders, other than Israelis, are various degrees of thugs, it may come down to the regrettable choice of the traditional the  "enemy of my enemy," etc. Thanks to Obama's giveaway of billions, we know who that mainly is - Iran and its client Hezbollah.

With Friends Like The Saudis

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

The U.S. cannot look aside at a royal Saudi hand in the murder of a U.S.-based journalist in its consulate in Istanbul. But before we separate ourselves from the Riyadh regime, we should ask what is the alternative if the House of Saud should be destabilized or fall? Wars are hell on monarchies. And if a new and larger Middle East war, with Iran, should break out in the Gulf, some of the Arab kings, emirs and sultans will likely fall. And when they do, history shows, it is not usually democrats who rise to replace them.

The Trump Doctrine

President Trump’s remarks at the UN were noteworthy, not so much for their radical departure from the interventionist policies of the two Bush presidents, and their rejection of the weakness and globalism of Obama, but for their return to the principles of George Washington.

Bring U.S. Forces Home from Syria

The Trump administration appears to share the belief of prior administrations that it can transform the Middle East in America’s image. But Washington’s record in the Middle East is catastrophic. It is time to bring home America’s troops.

John McCain, RIP: Washington’s War Party Loses its Leader

For the late Senator John McCain, war was a first resort, the obvious answer to most any international problem, whatever the specifics. If only Washington would impose its will abroad, Pax America would emerge.

War With Iran Could Destroy Trump’s Presidency

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

Any shooting war in the Persian Gulf could see insurance rates for tankers soar, a constriction of oil exports, and surging prices, plunging us into a worldwide recession for which one man would be held responsible: Donald Trump. If we start a war with Iran, on top of the five in which we are engaged still, then the party that offers to extricate us will be listened to, as Trump was listened to, when he promised to extricate us from the forever wars of the Middle East.

Trump Should Meet with Khamenei, not Rouhani

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

When the demonstrators in the streets of Tehran rightly cry "Death to the Dictator," Khamenei is the man they are talking about. Trump must meet with him. Mike Pompeo can deal with Rouhani. (Incidentally, the idea that Rouhani is a "moderate" is eyewash believed only by John Kerry and the editors of the New York Times. He has put more people to death than his supposedly hardline predecessor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.)

Trump Administration Should Balance Iran and Saudi Arabia

Candidate Trump appeared to understand Saudi Arabia. President Trump acts like other submissive royal retainers George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. Instead of campaigning to hand the Middle East over to the Saudi royals, the Trump administration should stand for America’s interests.

On Iran, Trump must learn from Obama's 'Red Line' error

Editors, Washington Examiner

There is no sense in issuing threats that require the choice between ill-advised U.S. action or lost U.S. credibility. President Trump's hard-headed realism has thus far restricted the Iranian regime's nuclear ambitions, reduced its expansionist power, and deterred its aggression. The president should not abandon that course in favor of emotive rhetoric that risks unnecessary conflict.

North Korea and Iran Don’t Seem Particularly Intimidated

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

U.S. threats to crush Iran and North Korea may yet work, but as of now neither Tehran nor Pyongyang appears to be intimidated. Where, then, are we headed? Surely, a partial, verifiable nuclear disarmament of North Korea is preferable to war on the peninsula. And, surely, a new nuclear deal with Iran with restrictions on missiles is preferable to war in the Gulf. Again, we cannot make the perfect the enemy of the good.

U.S. Has Leverage in Dealings with Iran and North Korea

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

In both the Iran deal and a potential North Korea deal, the United States has enormous leverage — and it should never forget that fact. Global sanctions can wreck the relatively small and vulnerable Iranian and North Korean economies. Even American sanctions alone and the ripples from them can injure Tehran and Pyongyang. The U.S. can also deter Iran and North Korea in a variety of other ways. For all their obnoxious bluster, the rogue governments of North Korea and Iran are more vulnerable than ever.

Stop Supporting Saudi Arabia in its War on the Yemeni People

The U.S. is at war in Yemen. Special Forces are on the ground in Saudi Arabia, while Washington is providing Riyadh’s military with munitions, targeting assistance, and aerial refueling. All to bomb a nation whose people have done nothing against Americans.

Trump Begins To Confront The Danger Of Iran

President Trump has made the right decision to take us out of the Obama nuclear weapons deal by reimposing sanctions on Iran and assembling a broad coalition to counter the totality of the regime’s malign activities. However, those “malign activities” are not things that only occur in the Middle East, Iran is conducting a war against us right here in the United States and fighting them here needs to be part of the President's new policy.

Conservatives Question Possible Syria Strike

The Constitution gives the war-making power to Congress, not the executive branch. "Promising war by tweet, insults not only the Constitution but every soldier who puts their life on the line,” Senator Rand Paul tweeted, referring to President Trump’s tweet singling out Russia for chemical weapons attacks in Syria.

John Bolton Appointment Divides Conservatives

Criticisms of the appointment of John Bolton as National Security Advisor have been strongly rebutted by a long list of national defense conservatives who reject the idea that everyone who wants to rebuild the military Obama intentionally hollowed out should automatically be dismissed as a “neocon.”

U.S. Sells Out Kurds, Reminding America Why it Should Just Stay Home

Despite working with the Kurds against ISIS, the administration has no stomach for a military game of chicken with Turkey. Which means the U.S. almost certainly would abandon the Kurds again if the Turks attack Manbij.

Saudi Charm Offensive Doesn't Excuse Religious Repression And War In Yemen

Washington’s relationship with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is embarrassing, counterproductive, and unnecessary. The Kingdom is as much foe as friend of American principles and interests. The U.S. should tell the Saudis that in the future it will deal with the Kingdom when convenient, without any pretense of friendship.

Are We Losing The Middle East War To Iran?

If our goal is to block Iran’s aspirations in Syria, but neither the United States nor Israel has been able to stop the proliferation of Iranian bases in Syria, then it looks to us like we, and the Israelis, are losing. The question for Gen. Votel and other commanders then becomes, if we are presently losing, what’s it going to take to win?

Is Senator Rand Paul Right About Afghanistan?

“I think the Afghan war is long past its mission. I think we killed and captured and disrupted the people who attacked us on 9/11 long ago. And I think now it's a nation building exercise... I think after 15 years and a trillion dollars that it's time for them to take over their country.” Senator Rand Paul (R-KY)

Washington Should Balance Saudi Arabia and Iran

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is promoting economic opportunity and social modernity, while seeking regional military hegemony. During the Cold War Washington’s close embrace of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia made a certain strategic sense. Today, a far more limited, arms-length relationship with what remains an intolerant and repressive power is needed.