American foreign policy

Foreign Policy Principle Number 1: Intervene in No More Civil Wars

Doug Bandow, The American Spectator

Despite the awful record of American intervention in civil wars, the administration appears determined to foment another one in Venezuela. But that tragic country is largely irrelevant to U.S. security. President Trump has an innate common sense lacked by Washington foreign policy elites: permanent war is the enemy of the American people and American greatness. Washington’s experience with foreign civil wars reinforces that conclusion. Right and Left should be able to agree on at least one foreign policy principle: stay out of other people’s civil wars.

John McCain, RIP: Washington’s War Party Loses its Leader

For the late Senator John McCain, war was a first resort, the obvious answer to most any international problem, whatever the specifics. If only Washington would impose its will abroad, Pax America would emerge.

The Unseen Wars of America the Empire

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

Like the Romans, we have become an empire, committed to fighting for scores of nations, with troops on every continent and forces in combat operations of which the American people are only vaguely aware. As in all empires, power is passing to the generals. And what causes the greatest angst today in the imperial city? Fear that a four-page memo worked up in the House Judiciary Committee may discredit Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russia-gate.

Bring Back Pax Americana

Daniel Henninger, Wall Street Journal

A stable world of productive institutions protected by military strength was the project led by the U.S. after World War II. It came to be known as Pax Americana, or peace through global U.S. leadership. In a world so disordered that attending church puts one’s life at risk, reinventing a Pax Americana appropriate to the 21st century is overdue.