budget deficit

Conservatives Balking At $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

President Trump campaigned on increasing infrastructure spending, but we see a carefully laid Democrat minefield looming in this latest “agreement” with plenty of political downside to the President and Republican 2020 candidates if he proposes raising taxes or blows up the deficit before the 2020 election.

McConnell Ready To Betray Trump on Spending

White House officials are leery of where budget talks between McConnell and Pelosi may lead, noting that the last bipartisan deal reached in early 2018 boosted spending by $300 billion over two years. Conservative policy experts are urging Trump not to trust McConnell to put together a spending deal that wouldn’t blow up the deficit.

Rush Makes Half Of A Great Point

Rush made the point that, to many voters, government's ability to keep spending is like water in the faucet - it's assumed it will always be there. But the part he left out is that one of the main reasons that is so is because under Speakers Boehner and Ryan Republicans stopped talking about fiscal restraint and started spending like Democrats.

The Only Way President Trump’s Infrastructure Plan Works

The focus on projects that contribute to GDP growth is what makes the President’s plan workable – or at least worth considering – in this age of massive deficits. Congress should keep the focus there and resist the temptation to siphon money off to boondoggles (like bike paths, parks and trails) that do not produce a return on investment through GDP growth.

Paul Ryan at the Center of DC’s Culture of Lies

The Wisconsin Republican primary election is tomorrow, August 9. We urge limited government constitutional conservatives and all other voters in Wisconsin Congressional District 1 who want a Congressman who represents the interests of American workers and their families to go to the polls tomorrow, August 9, and vote for Paul Nehlen to replace Paul Ryan as their Representative in Congress.

7 Lies Obama Tells On Reducing Budget Deficit

Pete Kasperowicz, The Blaze

When Obama took office, the national debt was $10.6 trillion. As of Jan. '15, it stood at just over $18 trillion. If the budget deficit stays around $500 billion a year for the next two years, as expected, total debt will exceed $19 trillion by the time O leaves office.