culture

Cancel culture isn't real life — yet

Salena Zito, Washington Examiner

However visible this cancel culture and boycott fever are, they have not found their way into American life in a broad and meaningful way. When they do, it often backfires. Consider the case of Chick-fil-A, when the social justice crowd went into full protest against the Georgia-based company for the faith of its leadership. Despite hundreds of protests, and government bodies in San Antonio and Buffalo, New York, banning their restaurants in their airports, nothing has gotten in the way of Chick-fil-A's unmatched growth. What would things would look like, though, if real life did become like Twitter?

All The People Who Think They Are Better Than You Are Much, Much Worse

Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

In what way has our garbage elite proven itself capable of doing anything right, much less overseeing our doctors, protecting our newly-disarmed citizenry and controlling the weather? In no way – which is why they hate accountability, and why the elite’s lapdog media is entirely unconcerned with the elite’s constant screw-ups and utterly focused on the invented flaws of those of us who refuse to be serfs of incompetent elitist twerps. They figure that if maybe if we can be shamed into subservience, they can get on with their civilizational pillage unimpeded by us Normals demanding accountability.

'The Hunt' movie reveals just how far liberals' derangement will take them

Tammy Bruce, Washington Times

Mr. Trump has been the one steady, reasonable voice in the midst of this "The Hunt" madness. In his statement after the El Paso and Dayton shootings, he condemned racism and bigotry, but also dared to address the multitude of issues we face, “We must recognize that the internet has provided a dangerous avenue to radicalize disturbed minds and perform demented acts. … We must stop the glorification of violence in our society. … It is too easy today for troubled youth to surround themselves with a culture that celebrates violence. …” High-profile liberals say Trump is the problem: Perhaps they need to look in the mirror.

The Common Thread Binding These Mass Murderers

Melissa MacKenzie, The American Spectator

Maybe murder is a response to nothing. At least rage is something. And rage is powerful. It must seem better than the alternative. How do we solve that problem? How do we help young men, especially, feel like their lives have meaning? That the supposed deep thinkers are blaming their political enemies demonstrates how pathetic our intellectual class really is. These mass murderers are multiplying, and the common thread isn’t politics. It’s powerlessness in a sea of prosperity. It seems we’ve brought up a generation of people who have everything and feel empty at the same time. The solutions are not easy. Maybe that’s why people blame politics. It’s easier.

Why conservatives must engage in Hollywood

Sam Sorbo, Washington Times

Why does the size of government only seem to grow, with conservative victories merely coming in fits and starts? One major reason is that liberals dominate culture, which has a much more profound impact on people’s worldview than policy analysis. Culture, and entertainment specifically, taps into people’s emotions, reaching a deeper level of the brain than rational appeals that usually don’t penetrate the frontal cortex. If conservatives want to reverse the juggernaut of the leftist agenda, the long march through the institutions, they must commit to engaging in cultural spheres even more than they do in intellectual ones.

Democrats Double Down On Hating America

Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

The current Democrat Party consists of hipster geebos, race hustlers, pierced campus mutants, bitter middle-aged divorcées who teach high school, tech twerps and uninvited foreigners who shouldn’t even be here. Their platform, carried out by the carnival freakshow that is the Democrat Party and its allies in the media and in the woke corporations, is part of a greater strategy. It’s to denigrate and then destroy what makes America America, to steal our story from us and replace it with a bogus legacy of oppression and misery. They want to impose upon us a new narrative of a morally stained America unworthy of respect or gratitude, and guess who will be the heroes of that new narrative?

Restoring the Great American Middle

Sen. Josh Hawley, The American Conservative

We need a new politics of national renewal. We must begin by rejecting old orthodoxies—unfettered trade at any cost; a permissive immigration system; a tax code that favors corporate tax shelters and corporate offshoring; economic policy that rewards concentration—and put American workers first. We must repair the torn fabric of our civic life. And we need a better understanding of liberty. For in the end, liberty is more than selling or buying or the right to be left alone. It’s the ability to have a say, to have a stake, and together, to set the course of our own history. That is the promise of our founding revolution, and that is the promise we must renew for this day.

Big Abortion’s Biggest Lie

David Catron, The American Spectator

Of all the lies promulgated by the abortion industry, the claim that abortion on demand has improved the lives of women in general is the most pernicious. It encourages women to make uninformed choices which can and do damage their physical and psychological health. Yet, despite the absence of evidence supporting the liberation myth, it has been inculcated in young women for nearly half a century by the education system, the media, and professional feminists. The vast majority of women who actually get abortions are low-income women of color abortion's biggest defenders will ever have to face at a D.C. cocktail party. Has abortion on demand improved their lives?

Are Abortion and Gay Rights American Values?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

Under our Constitution, many practices are protected — abortion, blasphemy, pornography, flag-burning, trashing religious beliefs — that other nations regard as symptoms of a disintegrating society. When Hillary Clinton said half of all Trump supporters could be put into a "basket of deplorables" for being "racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic," she was conceding that many Trump's supporters detest many progressive values. True, but in the era of Trump, why should her liberal values be the values America champions abroad? Without an agreed-upon higher authority, values become matters of opinion. And ours are in conflict and irreconcilable.

Why Celebrity Politics Matters

Ben Shapiro, CNS News

Our cultural arbiters have reacted to the political victory of their opposition with renewed attempts to merge culture and politics — they've gotten more extreme, louder, more pronounced in their determination to shift the culture to their point of view. Which will, of course, drive more political divisions. A pluralistic democracy requires three factors to function: a shared cultural space; a shared belief in key ideas, largely embedded in the Constitution; and a shared willingness to leave one another alone. As each component erodes, so, too, does the possibility of a united country.

The High Price of Cultural Change

William Murchison, The American Spectator

The Doris Day era — which I recall keenly — wasn’t perfect by any means. Is any era perfect? There would never be growth, if so. The thing about the Doris Day era that should remind us of Doris’ entitlement to significant news coverage, is its general — I say general, not total — lack of personal rancor or contempt for the otherwise-minded: meaning those yahoos who don’t agree with me! Even Republicans and Democrats kind of, sort of, got along. That was in part, I think, because government in the Doris Day era mattered much less than today, and cost less: offering fewer occasions for dispute.

Things That Can’t Go on Forever Simply Don’t

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

History always offers guidance to the eventual end game when people are unwilling to give up their chauvinism. Vicious tribal war can break out as in contemporary Syria. The nation can fragment into ethnic enclaves as seen in the Balkans. Or factions can stake out regional no-go zones of power as we’ve seen in Iraq and Libya. In sum, the present identity-politics divisiveness is not a sustainable model for a multiracial nation, and it will soon reach its natural limits one way or another. On a number of fronts, if Americans do not address these growing crises, history will. And it won’t be pretty.

Plan To See Unplanned

Unplanned is an important film because it makes us consider the moral weight of the mind-numbing statistic of the 60 million abortions that have been performed in the United States since Roe v Wade. Through the eyes of one woman who once believed she was doing good, we see the horror of abortion for what it truly is.

The Continued Resilience of Quiet America

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

Fifty years later, what are the lessons of the chaotic year 1969 for our similarly schizophrenic age of polarization, civil disunity, and unprecedented wealth and scientific advancement? America is such a huge and diverse country, and so abundantly endowed with natural and human resources, that it is capable of achieving unprecedented scientific, economic, and technological breakthroughs even as its social fabric is tearing apart. Or, put another way, while the media highlights crime, protests, grievances, and civil disorder, a majority of Americans still go to work unbothered each day.

Rising Anti-Americanism And The Left’s Big Lie

Timothy Daughtry, Townhall

Conservatives are waking up to the reality that those who shape the culture shape the political future.  Winning elections in the short term is critical, of course, but it is in the culture that the battle for our political future will be won or lost.   It will take time for conservatives to engage the left in the battle for our cultural institutions, but a good first step is recognizing and confronting the lies that the left has been telling Americans about America. And the biggest and boldest lie being peddled by the left is that America is the source of most of the world’s ills.

Cultural Winners and Losers of 2018

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

In the Trump era, wherein content creators are judged solely on political impact — are they offering enough "Resistance"? — instead of the quality of their product. The Democratic gains in the midterms should make the left happy about its political fortunes, excepting that every day President Trump remains in office is intolerable. Culturally it's a mixed bag. Though the products offered are overwhelmingly leftist, deconstructionist or both, the audience response is often unsupportive. When there is a rare nod toward a pro-conservative or pro-American message, the public's response is enthusiastic. Here are some of the Cultural Winners and Losers of 2018.

2019: The Year of the Wokescolds

Ben Shapiro, Investor's Business Daily

Wokescolds are the new representatives of moral panic. We've seen plenty of moral panic before in the United States, from worries about violent video games, to concern about allegations of sex abuse at day care facilities. But never have we seen a moral panic of the stunning breadth of today's woke moral panic. It's a moral panic that insists we change fundamental characteristics of our society, from biology, to language, to politics, to religion, to romantic relations, to art, to comedy. The Wokescolds will certainly lose. But not before they destroy a lot of people and fray the social fabric nearly beyond repair.

Is Hollywood Dead?

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Hollywood may not be entirely dead, but it's certainly dead for most conservatives. Few go to many movies and who can blame them? Fortunately for them, however, they're not missing much. They should be reassured that Hollywood isn't all that important anymore. Conservatives really do have something to worry about, but it's not entertainment. That's voluntary. It's education. That's not. I may vote in the Oscars this year, but I doubt that I'll watch them.

Liberal Elites Are Even Ruining Hamburgers And They Must Be Stopped

Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

Look. They’ve taken Hollywood. They’ve taken the media. They’ve taken the college campuses. And they’ve messed them all up. We can’t give up burgers, too. My upcoming book contains no burger recipes, because normal people don’t need burger recipes. Normals take meat, throw it on a grill, put it on a bun, put some stuff on it, and eat it like the heroes they are. And liberals? They screw up everything they touch. The arts. Academia. Dinner. So, confirm your normality by rejecting burger mutations. And confirm Kavanaugh, too.

First Multi-Season Series about the Story of Jesus Nears $4.5 Million Goal

The Chosen—the very first multi-season series about the life of Jesus, is directed by Dallas Jenkins, and has passed $4 million in crowdfunding, with less than $500,000 needed to begin prodution. Here's how you can learn more about the movie and how you can help put the story of Jesus on TV.