foreign policy

Reciprocity Is the Method to Trump’s Madness

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

Trump’s entire foreign policy can be summed up as a demand for symmetry from all partners and allies, and tit-for-tat replies to would-be enemies. Did Trump have to be so loud and often crude in his effort to bully America back to reciprocity? Who knows? But it seems impossible to imagine that globalist John McCain, internationalist Barack Obama, or gentlemanly Mitt Romney would ever have called Europe, NATO, Mexico, and Canada to account, or warned Iran or North Korea that tit would be met by tat.

Trump's diplomatic belligerence

Editors, Washington Examiner

Trump, when he talks about international relations, sometimes goes too far. But when he grumbles about allies “taking advantage” of us, he is not wrong. It is true that in NATO and other international institutions America is generally the boss, and it would be folly to demolish or abandon these institutions and this order. But that does not mean they are not in dire need of improvement or that it is not time to try methods of persuasion tougher than those deployed in the past. Trump is applying pressure to our allies to hold them accountable, to make the alliances work. Sometimes that involves being a bit brusque.

The Establishment Hearts China

Steven J. Allen, American Greatness

China is a totalitarian police state that tortures and jails dissidents and seeks to intimidate anyone who gets in its way. It’s killed more of its own people than any other government, ever. But many members of the American establishment see China as a partner, a role model, and the wave of the future. They believe that, instead of fighting the Communists, we should work with them and emulate them. The arguments against democracy by many of our opinion leaders and industrialists sound as if they were crafted by Chinese Communists? Great fools think alike, I suppose.

Burma Lurches Back Toward Ethnic and Religious Conflict

The Trump administration doesn’t appear to be paying attention, let alone seeking a solution, to the increasing conflict. For Burma much depends on the government ending its multi-front war on its own people. Unfortunately, the West has few good options concerning Burma.

Trump's New Foreign Policy: The Cooptation Doctrine

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

The Cooptation Doctrine -- Sanction the hell out of the leader of a despotic Third World country, then go meet him and promise, if he mends his ways, to make his country rich and him even richer. Trump realizes instinctually what we all know from history. Ideology be damned -- being a communist dictator is all about making a fortune off the backs of "the people."  (Castro died a billionaire).  Of course, it helps that you place the despot's regime under those extreme sanctions before you offer him paradise and not let up with those sanctions until he relents and signs.

Trump Could Be One of America's Great Foreign Policy Presidents

David P. Goldman, PJ Media

Liberal media is aghast at the president's rough handling of Canadian boy-band frontman Justin Trudeau, and his confrontational approach overall at the Group of Seven summit. When the dust settles, though, Trump may accomplish what eluded Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama: a stabler and safer world without the need for millions of American boots on the ground. He well may go down in history as one of our great foreign policy presidents. It's not in the bag, but it is within sight.

When it comes to the international chess game, Trump is a master

Charlie Kirk, The Hill

Donald Trump stepped straight into the Oval office as a titan of industry. He is now operating U.S. foreign policy as he would his business enterprise. He is maximizing the value of the U.S. brand. He is boldly stepping into new markets. He is looking at lost markets and deciding how to regain them. He is figuring out which are his non-productive divisions and jettisoning them.

Trump's His Own Good Cop/Bad Cop—and That's Good

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Trump has taken his flexible approach to new heights by being his own one-man good cop/bad cop, alternately vilifying and coaxing, even buttering up, his adversaries, often at what appears to be a dizzying pace. The press is ever eager to attack him for this (as they are for everything else), but as of now, his technique seems to be working.  He communicates with Kim Jong-un and North Korea’s leadership as a person, not as some executive branch/State Department construct, spouting the hoary rhetoric of diplomacy.

Trump inherits Reagan's wind

Charles Hurt, Washington Times

Mr. Trump is a stunning departure from all his predecessors back to Reagan. Drawing rebuke and scorn, Reagan refused to live in a world that accepted Mutual Assured Destruction as a normal existence. He vowed to change that. A nuclear Korean peninsula with missiles aimed at our Western cities has long become a new accepted norm. But not to Mr. Trump. Same with Iran, radical Islamic terrorism and illegal immigration streaming across our border with Mexico. Like Mr. Trump, Reagan’s top priority was to Make America Great Again.

Stop Supporting Saudi Arabia in its War on the Yemeni People

The U.S. is at war in Yemen. Special Forces are on the ground in Saudi Arabia, while Washington is providing Riyadh’s military with munitions, targeting assistance, and aerial refueling. All to bomb a nation whose people have done nothing against Americans.

Saved by our bold disrupter

Michael Goodwin, New York Post

Trump’s approach to national security leverages America’s strengths instead of being paralyzed by potential pitfalls. He is not, like his predecessor, “leading from behind” or doing nothing under the guise of “strategic patience.” Instead, he is proving to be the same bold disrupter on the international stage that he is in domestic politics. Trump's message is: We stick with our friends, and we stick it to those who would do us harm.

Trump is putting the US back on top

Michael Goodwin, New York Post

It’s premature to declare the death of the foolish idea that America is in permanent decline and must accept a lower rung on the global ladder. It is already clear that American Exceptionalism is making a comeback, and you don’t have to support President Trump to appreciate the benefits of his policies. These changes are still in the early innings and could collapse in a pile of false hopes. But the fact that they are on the table and moving forward marks a dramatic turnaround from the recent certainty that the post-World War II order America had fashioned and policed was kaput.

Trump leads in a different direction

Editors, Washington Examiner

Today, as the leaders on the Korean Peninsula call for a Nobel Peace Prize for Trump, as Trump has unified Sunni nations in a counterterrorism effort, as he begins work with Ukraine and the Baltic nations to counter Russia’s aggression, and as he fosters a bond with France’s Emmanuel Macron, it’s impossible with a straight face to call Trump an isolationist or say America has retreated from the world. Trump’s foreign policy record is one of America continuing its role as global leader — even if we’re leading in a direction that displeases John Kerry.

Not Being A Wimp Works

Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

There’s a lesson there. It’s a lesson that was never learned by our betters like Ben Rhodes and Susan Rice and all the other bloody-handed fools who managed to hobble the most powerful nation on earth for nearly a decade at the cost of hundreds of thousands of American and foreign lives. The United States is powerful because it is strong, but only when it is ready, willing, and able to use that power to serve America’s interests. The world saw Barack Obama was weak, feckless and afraid. It sees that Donald Trump is none of those things, so it fears him.

Trump Seeks Middle Ground in Foreign-Policy Balancing Act

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

The loyal Trump voter says not to intervene. The rabid Trump haters say to intervene. And the fence-sitters will eventually offer judgment based only on the success or failure of the mission. For now, Trump should keep quiet, stop tweeting his intentions, and give no indication of what he might do next. If he decides to act again in the future, then he should do it unexpectedly, with overwhelming force, and with the intention that he won’t have to do it again very often.

Trump Vastly Better than Obama at Foreign Policy

Roger L. Simon, PJ Media

Trump, as he has demonstrated, has little use for ideology or even consistency. In a constantly changing world, he may be right. Those who are looking for some sort of Trump Doctrine may be looking for something that is actually outmoded. So far he is being more successful than Obama and all the neo-Marxist works of Marcuse, Gramsci, etc. combined.

Fear, loathing and John Bolton

Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

Bluster is an effective weapon in the hands of someone who knows how to use a weapon. Mr. Bolton, like the president, has never been interested in being polite to the imams in Tehran or to Rocket Man in Pyongyang. He has never been a fan of nation-building, particularly when it means deconstructing the nation and everything about it, from its history, culture, even its religion. He’s not a fan because it can’t be done.

Syrian Showdown: Trump vs. the Generals

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

Will we defy President Assad with the possibility U.S. planes and troops could be engaging Syrians, Russians, Iranians and Shiite militias, in a country where we have no right to be? Trump is being denounced as an isolationist. But what gains have we reaped from 17 years of Middle East wars — from Afghanistan to Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — to justify all the blood shed and the treasure lost? And how has our great rival China suffered from not having fought in any of these wars?

Is Trump Assembling a War Cabinet?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

Trump was nominated because he promised to keep us out of stupid wars like those into which folks like John Bolton and the Bush Republicans plunged us. What is Trump, who assured us there would be no more stupid wars, thinking? Truman and LBJ got us into wars they could not end, and both lost their presidencies. Eisenhower and Nixon ended those wars and were rewarded with landslides. Once Trump seemed to understand this history.

German Populists Shut Out: Establishment Parties Risk Terminal Decline

“If the mainstream parties don’t cover key subjects such as security and migration, they will be captured by radicals from both the left and right.” Disenfranchising those who are frustrated and angry is unlikely to deliver the kind of prosperous, peaceful future that most of us desire.