gerrymandering

SCOTUS Got Gerrymandering Case Right

Hans von Spakovsky, CNS News

The Supreme Court, in an opinion written by Chief Justice John Roberts and joined by the other (generally) conservative justices, concluded that this is a nonjusticiable political question for which there is a lack of discoverable and manageable standards. This is the right decision by the court. As Roberts said in his conclusion, “no one can accuse” the Supreme Court of “having a crabbed view of the reach of its competence.” But whatever competence the court may have, it has no “commission to allocate political power and influence in the absence of a constitutional directive or legal standards to guide” them.  This is an example of the “rare circumstance” where it is the Supreme Court’s “duty to say ‘this is not the law.’”

Partisan Gerrymandering: Courts Should Keep Out of the Debate

Hans A. Von Spakovsky and Michael Watson, National Review

The allocation of representatives in a state legislature or in the U.S. House of Representatives is a fundamental political question that cannot be resolved without political considerations. Democrats know this, which is why they are demanding major revisions to the way elections are held for the U.S. House of Representatives in their H.R. 1 bill — major revisions they could exploit to increase their political power. Funny, they never complained about partisan redistricting that favored the Democrat party when they controlled a majority of state legislatures. Claims that this or that system for drawing the boundary lines of state and congressional districts is “nonpolitical” are a myth.

The Most Important Election You Never Heard Of

We first met Frank LaRose in 2006 and found him to be one of the most impressive men of his generation in Republican politics. The Left understands the importance of Ohio in 2020, which is why Hollywood PAC money has been pouring in to support his liberal opponent. We urge you to support and vote for Frank LaRose for Ohio Secretary of State.

Run Eric Run

There is no danger in an Eric Holder run for President, his most dangerous activity is not out in the far away future of the 2020 presidential election. What’s dangerous is what he’s up to right now; stage managing the continuation of the Soros-funded racial polarization of America.

The dog ate my congressional district

Editors, Washington Examiner

Gerrymandering is massively overrated as a problem, both in its power to determine election outcomes in the House and in its effect on the national political climate. But it's perfectly appropriate for activists to take their complaints about it to their state capitols, to influence legislators and to force referenda on the subject. Federal courts should not be touching maps, let alone redrawing them in either party's favor just because the current ones look like a dog's breakfast.

Democrats find excuses for election losses in lawsuits

Editors, Washington Examiner

There is only one reason this case is being heard now. It is that Democrats still haven't accepted their loss in the 2016 election. They can fall back on Hillary Clinton's victory in the national popular vote, but they lost the popular vote for the House of Representatives. Incapable, apparently, of accepting that their ideas and candidates have fallen short, they are peddling to their demoralized followers the notion that they lost because of gerrymandering.

Why Obama Is Staying In Washington

Obama’s decision to stay in DC was simple; he’s staying around to stagemanage the continuation of the Soros-funded racial polarization of America and to focus those efforts where they will stifle election integrity efforts and make Eric Holder’s job at the National Democratic Redistricting Committee that much easier.

Supreme Court Grapples, Once Again, With Redistricting

Michael Barone, Real Clear Politics

Courts can't stop partisan gerrymandering entirely. But they can limit its effectiveness by enforcing strict numerical equality, by simple arithmetic. Supreme Court justices weary of redistricting cases might keep that in mind.