Mueller investigation

Still waiting for the garlic bullet

Wesley Pruden, Washington Times

Donald Trump called James Comey a “slimeball,” which is not a very presidential way to talk. But just this time we might have to forgive the president. James Comey really is a slimeball. Just about everybody says so. The critics of his book, finally out Monday after the weekend news accounts had already begun squeezing the juice out of it, joined in a rare unanimous appraisal of the man who wrote the book. He’s a windbag, a hack, a blowhard, a swaggering pretender, a churl and the hindquarters of a horse.

Mueller at the Crossroads

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

If the special counsel’s investigation has turned into a political cause, Mueller will no doubt prefer the third option. That is, Mueller’s report (and possibly more indictments of minor campaign aides) would probably appear shortly before the midterm elections. If Democrats win the House, then they will probably shut down all congressional investigations of the FBI and the DOJ — and perhaps all reviews of the actions of Mueller himself.

It Would Still Be Foolish for Trump to Talk to Mueller

Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review

Impeachment is a political process, not a legal one. Were Trump to convince enough people that Mueller’s investigation is a politicized witch hunt, there would not be enough votes in the Senate to remove him, even if a Democratic-controlled House impeached him. And impeachment is unpopular, so Democratic agitation for it might ironically help him politically. The president may calculate that he can control the damage if agreeing to an interview by the special counsel turns out to be a bad bet. I still don’t see what’s in it for him.

This trap was set well before Trump won

Charles Hurt, Washington Times

At the height of the presidential election, the administration of the outgoing president of the United States — Mr. Trump’s most powerful political enemy — handed over the controls of America’s spy apparatus to begin moving against Mr. Trump and his campaign. So special counsel Robert Mueller’s endless investigation in search of a crime should have been no surprise. It was cooked up long before Mr. Trump even won the election. Of course, these people were going to do this.

The Paradoxes of the Mueller Investigation

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

Investigating any possible crimes committed by members of the Clinton campaign or the Obama administration apparently is taboo, given the exalted status of both. But every time Mueller seeks to find incidental wrongdoing by those around Trump, he only makes the case stronger that behavior by those involved in the Clinton campaign and the Obama administration should be investigated.