race

We Have an Identity Problem

Walter E. Williams, CNS News

Suppose a man is convicted and sentenced to a 10-year term at California State Prison, Corcoran. Should he be able to claim that he is a woman and be allowed to serve out his sentence at the California Institution for Women? With privileges being determined by race and sex, we need something like South Africa's apartheid-era Population Registration Act of 1950 to define in clear terms who belongs to what race and what sex and thereby prevent race and sex fraud.

Is America's Racial Divide Permanent?

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

For many, race has become a constant preoccupation. And over each of these incidents and disputes, the country divides along the familiar fault lines, and the accusations go on and on until a new incident engenders a new argument. The America of the 1960s, with its civil rights clashes and “long hot summers,” was a far more segregated society than today. Yet the toxic charge of “racist” is far more common now.

The Confederate Mind

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

A century from now, our successors are likely to be as bewildered by the classifications of affirmative action and designated safe spaces as we are by segregation and “separate but equal” schools. A century after the Civil War, in reaction to the legacy of the Confederacy, progressives fought for integration; a century and a half after the Civil War, progressives are channeling the one-drop rule and advocating race-based dorms, safe spaces, and race-themed houses.

When Racial Hoaxes Make News

L. Brent Bozell III and Tim Graham, CNS News

In the angst-ridden aftermath of Donald Trump's election, the media found vindication by reporting all kinds of "hate crime" incidents, lurching so eagerly that they fell for a few that turned out to be hoaxes. Any media outlet that leaps on a small incident of vandalism as a grand statement on Where America Stands ought to have the courage to make a public acknowledgment when the story is fraudulent. To do otherwise is to stoke racial fires with dishonesty.

Justice Is Bigger Than Narrative

David French, National Review

There is only one way through the tribalism of competing narratives, and that’s through a commitment to justice. No, not “social justice.” True justice — the quest for evidence, the search for facts, and the dispensation of punishment without regard to race, creed, class, or religion.

Is Charlotte Our Future?

Patrick J. Buchanan, BernardGoldberg.com

In a nation of 320 million, if every collision between white cops and black men resulting in the death of a suspect is to be seen as legitimate grounds for mob action like Charlotte, we will never know racial peace. Like moths to a flame, TV cameras are attracted to conflict, especially racial conflict. Networks and TV stations reward with airtime the most incendiary of racial charges. Thus, the news going out to homes and bars will continue to polarize us along racial lines.

Univision CEO Demands: Choose Debate Moderators by Race

Jeffrey Lord, The American Spectator

Randy Falco, the president and CEO of Univision offered a mind-blowing demand to the Presidential Debate Commission that the recent announcement of moderators for the forthcoming debates be amended — by race. Said John F. Kennedy in his 1963 address to the nation: “Race has no place in American life or law.” Or on presidential debate panels either.

Tim Kaine Proves Rush Limbaugh’s Point

Jeffrey Lord, The American Spectator

Donald Trump would be well advised to call out Hillary Clinton with Rush Limbaugh’s idea. Here’s the trade: amnesty for illegals, but no citizenship — no right to vote — for 10, 15, or 25 years.

With 1 Week to Go, GOP's Confidence Grows

Alexander Bolton, The Hill

Repubs. are all but assured of winning the open seats vacated by retiring Democrats in Montana, South Dakota and West Virginia and have a very good chance of ousting Dem. incumbents in Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado and Louisiana.

Pelosi: Race Playing Role in GOP's Reluctance to Move Immigration Bill

Mike Lillis, The Hill

Issues of race have made GOP leaders reluctant to back immigration reform, Rep. Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) charged Thursday.