U.S. Foreign policy

Will COVID-19 Retire the World's Policeman?

Patrick J. Buchanan, CNS News

There are allegations that the coronavirus did not originate in the Wuhan "wet market" where bats are sold for food but instead escaped through a horrible blunder in a Chinese bioweapons laboratory a few miles away. Whatever the truth, the Wuhan virus appears to have become the most effective means of disabling U.S. hard and soft power that we have encountered in many a decade. Will this pandemic prove the decisive factor in America's retreat from global hegemony? With the U.S. budget deficit for 2020 originally set at $1 trillion, now triple that, there is going to be a hard reckoning for the allocation of our diminished resources after the nation reopens.

The Israel–U.S. Model Has Been a Resounding Success

Victor Davis Hanson, National Review

As with Israel, the U.S. is less eager to apply political litmus tests to its occasional allies. It also seeks to avoid quagmires where its overwhelming conventional firepower can be neutralized by terrorists and urban guerrillas. The promoters of these unconventional policies, Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu and U.S. president Donald Trump, are both despised by their respective establishments and under constant threat of removal by their livid political opponents. Yet they both have transformed their respective countries. Their policies remind us that it is sometimes preferable to be respected rather than just be liked — and that when a nation is strong and does not beg for help, it often finds more than it needs.

Understanding the Failure of U.S. Foreign Policy: The Albright Doctrine

Doug Bandow, National Interest

For Albright, war is just another foreign policy tool. One could send a diplomatic note, impose economic sanctions, or unleash murder and mayhem. No reason to treat the latter as anything special. Joining the U.S. military means putting your life at the disposal of Albright and her peers in The Blob. Unfortunately, the vagaries of U.S. foreign policy suggest that this mindset is not limited to any one person. Any president serious about taking a new foreign-policy direction must do more than drain the swamp. He or she must sideline The Blob.

Mattis Resignation Not To Be Feared

General James Mattis deserves our respect and appreciation for his many years of service to our country, but as Secretary of Defense his departure is not to be feared, and should be viewed as an opportunity to undo the remaining vestiges of Obama’s damaging influence on our military culture and to chart a new course in the war Islam has declared on the West.

Fighting Violent Extremism by Teaching Tolerance

In Erbil I watched Christians, Yazidis, Sunni and Shia Muslims, and a Jew, who had lost a hand in a terrorist bombing, work together. Personal transformation offers the only sure, long-term answer to build a more tolerant, less violent world.

Make a Deal with Russia: Neutralize Ukraine, End NATO Expansion

Taking NATO membership off the table would remove Moscow’s incentive to keep the Ukrainian conflict alive. Ukraine could develop economically and politically as it wished. Sanctions could end, encouraging economic integration from Europe through Ukraine onto Russia.

Hillary Clinton Never Met A War She Didn’t Want Other Americans To Fight

Of Hillary Clinton's belligerent record Donald Trump observed: “Sometimes it seemed like there wasn’t a country in the Middle East that Hillary Clinton didn’t want to invade, intervene in, or topple.”

The Cost of Obsolete Alliances

Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

Time for a reappraisal of all of the war guarantees this nation has issued since the beginning of the Cold War, to determine which, if any, still serve U.S. national interests in 2016. Alliances, after all, are the transmission belts of war. This is not isolationism. It is putting our country first, and staying out of other people’s wars. It used to be called patriotism.