Last night's Democratic Party primary debate was a real dumpster fire, and it was a dumpster full of Michael Bloomberg’s money that went up in flames. But the dumpster fire isn't out yet. Democrats still have to navigate a caucus system that was set up to stuff Bernie Sanders, but with Bloomberg's implosion they have no viable alternative to the socialist curmudgeon from Vermont.

Principled limited government constitutional conservative Republican Representative Chip Roy (TX-21) has stepped-up to oppose the backdoor amnesty plan being promoted by the open borders wing of the business community and their allies in the Senate’s Republican Conference. We urge CHQ readers to call their Senators (1-866-220-0044) to express opposition to the Farm Workforce Modernization Act.

Not even the infusion of new blood made this debate any more interesting than the previous iterations. The only thing the Democrat Vegas debate revealed was that the party has a heck of a Sanders-sized problem on their hands. Even if Biden somehow jumpstarts his on-deathwatch campaign, or Bloomberg emerges, or Klobuchar, or Buttigieg, or even “Pocahontas” Warren surges -- they still have to confront Trump later this year.

The entertainment of value of Bloomberg’s phoniness aside, the former New York City Mayor’s real problem is that the authentic Bloomberg would get buried in both the Democratic Party’s primary and the general election, because, judging by what the real Michael Bloomberg says in unscripted moments, he’s an even nastier elitist than Hillary Clinton.

One thing Donald Trump will never be is a punching bag, and as a consequence of what Jeb Bush and his ilk view as Trump’s incivility, the Republican Party has returned to its roots as a political movement that fights for its principles, rather than politely compromising them away.

National elections have a way of sorting things out and this year’s will be no different. Tonight, Democrat presidential candidates will hem and haw about “unity” and “restoring the soul of the nation,” but there’s no getting around the fact we’re one divided nation. And having Hillary Clinton as vice presidential nominee wouldn’t make it better.

CHQ Exclusives

Last night's Democratic Party primary debate was a real dumpster fire, and it was a dumpster full of Michael Bloomberg’s money that went up in flames. But the dumpster fire isn't out yet. Democrats still have to navigate a caucus system that was set up to stuff Bernie Sanders, but with Bloomberg's implosion they have no viable alternative to the socialist curmudgeon from Vermont.

Principled limited government constitutional conservative Republican Representative Chip Roy (TX-21) has stepped-up to oppose the backdoor amnesty plan being promoted by the open borders wing of the business community and their allies in the Senate’s Republican Conference. We urge CHQ readers to call their Senators (1-866-220-0044) to express opposition to the Farm Workforce Modernization Act.

Not even the infusion of new blood made this debate any more interesting than the previous iterations. The only thing the Democrat Vegas debate revealed was that the party has a heck of a Sanders-sized problem on their hands. Even if Biden somehow jumpstarts his on-deathwatch campaign, or Bloomberg emerges, or Klobuchar, or Buttigieg, or even “Pocahontas” Warren surges -- they still have to confront Trump later this year.

The entertainment of value of Bloomberg’s phoniness aside, the former New York City Mayor’s real problem is that the authentic Bloomberg would get buried in both the Democratic Party’s primary and the general election, because, judging by what the real Michael Bloomberg says in unscripted moments, he’s an even nastier elitist than Hillary Clinton.

One thing Donald Trump will never be is a punching bag, and as a consequence of what Jeb Bush and his ilk view as Trump’s incivility, the Republican Party has returned to its roots as a political movement that fights for its principles, rather than politely compromising them away.

National elections have a way of sorting things out and this year’s will be no different. Tonight, Democrat presidential candidates will hem and haw about “unity” and “restoring the soul of the nation,” but there’s no getting around the fact we’re one divided nation. And having Hillary Clinton as vice presidential nominee wouldn’t make it better.

Anything critical of Red China has been met with almost universal condemnation or censorship from the establishment media. However, Chinese citizen journalists, physicians and scientists whose reports have leaked out of China – in some cases at the peril of the reporter’s life – tell a story that suggests there may indeed be a connection between the coronavirus outbreak and China’s Wuhan bioweapons super lab.

We think that maybe Kelly O’Donnell is not old enough to remember the 1992 presidential campaign, but Maggie Haberman certainly is, and so we contrast the reception President Trump got at the Daytona 500 with the reception Bill Clinton got in 1992 when his motorcade entered Darlington speedway, where 70,000 rabid stock-car fans awaited the start of the Southern 500.

It is undoubtedly true that money helps “feed the wolf” in political campaigns. Without it you can’t pay staff, purchase advertisements, send out mailers or do other tried-and-true canvassing methods. But big bucks don’t buy everything. President Trump has a healthy war chest and issues on his side -- and that’s all he needs to succeed in November.

Our friend Deroy Murdock recently posted an analysis of the legislative scorecards for the Senators still in the race for the Democratic Party's nomination for President. It turns out that so-called moderates Amy Klobuchar and Joe Biden have often posted scores to the Left of Socialist Bernie Sanders. What's more, former Mayors Bloomberg and Buttigieg are every bit as Far Left as Sanders, Klobuchar, Biden and Warren.

President Trump is to be commended for his desire to bring our troops home, but he, and more importantly, the generals and diplomats who have been conducting the war since 2001 are fooling themselves if they think this arrangement – or any arrangement with the Taliban – will truly end the war. Here's why.

Anyone with eyes and experience knows Joe Biden’s campaign is in trouble and may be on unalterable death watch. But it’s still too early to say for sure whether the former Obama veep is comatose and headed for political obscurity. Nevada and South Carolina will have their say. Will Biden spring back to life?

Front Page Headlines

  • Tammy Bruce, Washington Times

    Michael Bloomberg is now serving as a perfect example of how identity politics works. It isn’t necessarily just about sex, race or even sexual preference; we can also be reduced and classified by being labeled a creature of our chosen profession. Considering his comments about a variety of people, including farmers, Mr. Bloomberg seems to have disdain for most Americans, and certainly those who get their hands dirty while working. Mr. Bloomberg’s attitude isn’t new, it’s what the so-called elite have always thought about us, they were just more circumspect about it. It’s also a reminder that the choices we make in November are not just about who holds an office, but about what this country becomes.

  • Rich Lowry, National Review

    It’s no wonder that Trump's Attorney General William Barr has a poorly disguised contempt for his critics, many of whom are so inflamed by their opposition to Trump that they’ve lost any sense of standards. In a peppery speech to a Federalist Society conference last year that is now one of the counts against him, Barr rightly warned that “it is the Left that is engaged in a systematic shredding of norms and the undermining of the rule of law.” At the end of the day, they really don’t want Trump to have an attorney general, but that’s not going to happen. If they force Barr out — or more likely, Trump’s continued tweeting pushes him over the edge — they’ll miss him when he’s gone.

  • R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr., The American Spectator

    Mrs. Thatcher pretty much believed as Ronald Reagan believed: Government is not the solution to our problem. Government is the problem. How many times did he say the most terrifying words he could imagine were, “I’m from the government, and I’m here to help”? Mrs. Thatcher had her own variation of this line. Ronald Reagan and Mrs. Thatcher got along swimmingly, and, come to think of it, Ronald Reagan and only Ronald Reagan shares a place with her in the bien-pensants’ pantheon of hated figures. Donald, your pathway to greatness is clearly marked. The hatred for Mrs. Thatcher — and President Reagan too — is quite startling to anyone familiar with what they achieved. I have come to love her.

  • Patrick J. Buchanan, The American Conservative

    The Philippine Islands are among the largest recipients of foreign aid in East Asia, and we’ve provided $1.3 billion in military assistance over the last two decades. But money shouldn’t be the largest consideration here. Trump has been given a historic opportunity to reshape American and Asian policy along the lines he ran on in 2016. He should tell Duterte that we accept his decision and that we, too, are giving notice of our decision to let the 1951 treaty lapse. And following expiration of that treaty, the U.S. will be absolved of any legal obligation to come to the defense of the Philippines. Time for Manila to take charge of its own defense. Trump should not miss this opportunity.

  • Michael Goodwin, New York Post

    I’m not seeing much evidence that Bloomberg fits the description of someone who offers a clear alternative with the others. Indeed, to judge from his policy proposals, the party is changing him more than he’s changing the party. His campaign website is chock-full of Big Government promises that echo the prohibitive give­aways of his opponents without exactly copying them. From issues like college tuition and student debt to climate change, tax hikes and health care, Bloomberg is proposing plans in which he’s mostly just shaved off the most extreme elements advocated by Sanders and Warren. He would do the same things, just a little bit less. That’s a distinction without much of a difference.

  • Editors, Washington Examiner

    The role that Buttigieg served in South Bend was a good one, which anyone should be proud to fill, but it is simply fantasy to suggest that the skill set he learned there prepared him for the White House. Sen. Amy Klobuchar had a point when she said that no woman with qualifications as thin as Buttigieg's would be standing on the presidential debate stage. The amazing thing, however, is that even a man with such thin qualifications would be suffered to stand there. America has elected inexperienced presidents before. When the former mayor claims that his service in South Bend has prepared him for the presidency, one can only wonder whether he's been spending too much time at the Linebacker.

  • Byron York, Washington Examiner

    As Attorney General William Barr looks into how it all started, some voices that were part of that frenzy are changing their tune about the value of investigations. They now express concern about investigations, concern that Barr is politicizing the Justice Department to go after perceived political enemies. An investigation lasting seemingly forever and putting one's family through hell? Imagine that! Coming from Andrew McCabe, the lack of self-awareness is so pronounced that it would be darkly funny, were not the events of the last three years so serious. More complaints are sure to come as Barr, and Barr's appointees, investigate the questionable acts of the investigators.

  • Christopher Bedford, The Federalist

    Never-Trump men and women agree with a media that has been proven wrong over and over again, but there is no room for self-awareness. The two-or-so weeks of journalistic self-reflection that followed the 2016 election gave way to race-baiting, conspiracies, and inquisitions. A promised focus on the heartland and The New York Times’s apology to its readership gave way to The 1619 Project. In what industry would this hubris survive except for media? Even in politics, a business filled with corrupt liars not even trying to deliver, its practitioners are held to task by elections. Not here. The club marches on, complete with back-handed back-slaps to the boys who carry its water.

  • Charles Hurt, Washington Times

    Seriously, Democrats, thank you for trying. For trying to understand normal God-fearing, freedom-loving Americans. Because there are none of those Democrats left any more. Democratic politicians today no longer even pretend to like America or American voters. This is a major reason why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016. And now they seem hellbent to repeat the same mistake this time. Watching the president’s limo — nicknamed “The Beast” — lap the track as the racing cars roared and rumbled behind it had to be a sight to behold. Not in attendance in Daytona were Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders or Mike Bloomberg. If there were any of the elusive “NASCAR Democrats” there, they were not speaking up.

  • David Catron, The American Spectator

    That people like Bernie Sanders, Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, et al. are touring the nation publicly abusing the president in order to capture the Democratic nomination is proof that Trump is not a tyrant. In a genuine dictatorship, there would be no alternative party from which to challenge him. He has the power to obliterate entire cities, yet the worst any of these people can expect from our Oval Office “autocrat” is a snarky tweet. If the Democrats want to win, they will have to stop running against an absurd caricature and try to learn what the president knows that they have missed. The voters will be happy to tell them if they will just shut the hell up and listen.

  • Stephen Moore, The Epoch Times

    Anti-Trumpers are still squawking from their lofty perches as if nothing that happens in the real world—rather than in la-la land or on MSNBC—really matters. Being wrong five or 10 or 100 times isn’t punishable; it can even win you a Nobel Prize. It is the unique sanctuary of punditry and academia. If you hired a stock picker that consistently recommended losing stocks, would you keep that person on retainer? If you hired a contractor and the house collapsed, would you pay him? If a football team lost every game, would you give the coach a five-year contract extension? But the press keeps turning to the same sources no matter how many times they have been wrong on the economy.

  • Walter E. Williams, CNS News

    Professors Mitchell Langbert and Sean Stevens conducted a new study of the political affiliation of 12,372 professors in the two leading private and two leading public colleges in 31 states. For party registration, they found a Democratic to Republican (D:R) ratio of 8.5:1, which varied by rank of institution and region. For donations to political candidates (using the Federal Election Commission database), they found a D:R ratio of 95:1, with only 22 Republican donors, compared with 2,081 Democratic donors.The true tragedy is that so many Americans are blind to the fact that today's colleges and universities pose a threat on several fronts to the well-being of our nation.

  • David Catron, The American Spectator

    If Sanders wins the Democratic nomination, he won’t attempt to hide his views behind euphemism and subterfuge. Carville, Penn, and other rational Democrats should get out of the way and let Trump take out Sanders and the radical Democrats who control the House. But this will work only if Sanders is the nominee. If some ostensible moderate is handed the Democratic nomination by the party elite and proceeds to lose, it will strengthen insurgent socialists like AOC. It’s time for a strategic retreat. That means defeat by Trump and the GOP in November, which would indeed be hard to swallow. In the end, however, it would be good for both parties and the nation as a whole.

  • Kurt Schlichter, Townhall

    Let Barr do his thing. Let Durham do his. I’m not going to Lucy and the football myself into believing that either one is definitely going to serve up the justice upon the Deep State derps that is the minimal requirement for beginning to rebuild the trust in federal law enforcement these hacks flushed away, but who knows? They might do something. In the meantime, we simply need to treat federal law enforcement as what it is: deeply corrupt and utterly untrustworthy. The other thing is that the president needs to pardon Roger Stone, Mike Flynn, and the others caught up in the scummy attempt to criminalize dissent. And he should commute Paul Manafort’s sentence to time served.

  • Roger L. Simon, The Epoch Times

    I say, keep on keepin’ on, Donald. The reason is simple. He has no choice. He has no other place to go, really. Most of the media (the major newspapers, the networks and all of cable news with the exception of Fox, which is not always reliable) are lined up against him. Indeed, as we all know, they have wanted him out of office from before he even had it. Even the Wall Street Journal doesn’t give him a fair shake in their front pages that are little different from those of the New York Times and the Washington Post. All rely on nefarious, anonymous leaks aimed at bringing the president down. How, other than Twitter, can he really get his message out the way he wants it?